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Lack of Oxford Comma Could Cost Maine Company Millions in Overtime Dispute

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Daniel Victor, reporting for The New York Times:

A class-action lawsuit about overtime pay for truck drivers hinged entirely on a debate that has bitterly divided friends, families and foes: The dreaded — or totally necessary — Oxford comma, perhaps the most polarizing of punctuation marks.

What ensued in the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, and in a 29-page court decision handed down on Monday, was an exercise in high-stakes grammar pedantry that could cost a dairy company in Portland, Me., an estimated $10 million. […]

The debate over commas is often a pretty inconsequential one, but it was anything but for the truck drivers. Note the lack of Oxford comma — also known as the serial comma — in the following state law, which says overtime rules do not apply to:

The canning, processing, preserving, freezing, drying, marketing, storing, packing for shipment or distribution of:

(1) Agricultural produce;

(2) Meat and fish products; and

(3) Perishable foods.

The dairy company argued that “packing for shipment” and “distribution” were two different items in the list; the truck drivers argued that it was just one item: “packing for shipment or distribution”.

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rtreborb
5 days ago
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1 public comment
dannberg
8 days ago
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I've never heard a valid argument *against* using the Oxford Comma, except "that's just how we do it here."
New York City

Listening

4 Comments and 21 Shares
Sure, you could just ask, but this also takes care of the host gift thing.
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rtreborb
17 days ago
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JayM
22 days ago
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Hahaha
Atlanta, GA
sdevore
22 days ago
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Alexa, play some funky music
Tucson, AZ
Covarr
22 days ago
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Alexa, set an alarm for 1 am every day.
Moses Lake, WA
alt_text_bot
22 days ago
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Sure, you could just ask, but this also takes care of the host gift thing.

YouTube TV: $35/Month ‘Skinny Bundle’ of TV Networks to Launch in Spring

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Peter Kafka, reporting for Recode:

Like other new digital TV services, YouTube TV won’t offer every network that cable TV services provide; instead it will feature a “skinny bundle,” composed of the four broadcast networks — Fox, ABC, CBS and NBC — along with some of the cable channels related to the broadcasters. Which means you’ll also get networks like Fox News, ESPN and Bravo; YouTube execs says the base package will include about three dozen channels.

Sports are still a problem:

Also be aware that all of the digital TV services still have gaps in their coverage, usually around pro football: Deals — or lack of them — with local affiliates may affect your ability to watch your local NFL team play next fall. And none of the streaming TV services will let you watch football on your phone, because those rights, for now, are exclusive to Verizon.

YouTube TV’s pricing will make it hard/impossible for YouTube to turn a profit, given the carriage fees it has to shell out for the four big networks, but YouTube doesn’t seem concerned about that: Right now it wants to work on turning some of its billion-plus users into paying subscribers.

Seems crazy that Google, a company famous for providing its services free of charge, would have a paid bundle of video content before Apple does.

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rtreborb
20 days ago
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Steps in the right direction
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Disney develops Wireless Power Transfer and demonstrates safe transfer of 1900 watts with 40-95% efficiency

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Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power.



PLOS One - Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer






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rtreborb
36 days ago
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Very cool
skorgu
39 days ago
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Photo

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rtreborb
43 days ago
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Ellen.
popular
45 days ago
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leandrocalderon
41 days ago
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Ops
ChrisDL
45 days ago
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hello self.
New York
wreichard
46 days ago
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This is my brand of bed as well.
Earth
Technicalleigh
48 days ago
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it me
SF Bay area, CA (formerly ATL)

Single do miss out

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A few years ago, I went viral with a post about singleness. It was a copy and paste sermon and not very well written, however it seemed to make a […]



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rtreborb
43 days ago
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Both good gifts, both bring joy
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